NSFW Sunday Is in Your Sex Dreams

Feature image of Erykah Ohms and Tina Horn in Crash Pad Series episode 262. All of the photographs in this NSFW Sunday are from the Crash Pad. The inclusion of a visual here should not be interpreted as an assertion of the model’s gender identity or sexual orientation. If you’re a photographer or model and think your work would be a good fit for NSFW Sunday, please email carolyn at autostraddle dot com.

Welcome to NSFW Sunday!

Valentine and Calico in Crash Pad episode 232

There are lots of ways to feel lonely, yes even if you’re in a romantic partnership(s):

“[C]ulturally, we still have really narrow views about loneliness, starting with what the experience actually is. In pop culture, lonely characters are usually always depicted in situations where they are by themselves, locked up in a bedroom or looking out a rainy window. But in reality, emptiness is a little more nuanced. ‘A person can feel lonely anywhere, with or without people,’ says Amy Banks, a neurobiologist and author of Wired to Connect. ‘Maybe you aren’t feeling seen, or others are busy and you want to connect, or maybe there is conflict and you feel that a particular relationship is a little tenuous. Loneliness can happen when you have a family, friends, colleagues, or a significant other, but you feel out of sync with those around you.'”

Golden Curlz and Vivienne Vai in Crash Pad Series episode 273

Here are some foreplay tips.

Oh Joy Sex Toy covered menstruation.

Here’s how to help a friend in an abusive relationship.

Dreams can help people process breakups and grief. Here’s one take on interpreting them. And here are a few common sex dreams.

Cosmic and Miss Yum in Crash Pad Series episode 246

The best place to flirt is in instagram DM, writes Maria Del Russo at the Cut:

“[H]iding behind a screen means I can unleash. I don’t have to be afraid of sending a heart-eyes emoji, because if I don’t get the response I want, I can just delete it and forget it existed. It’s easier to play off a misguided flirt on Instagram. And since I can think out my responses, I become infinitely more witty.”

Maxine Azula and Valerie Paige in Crash Pad Series episode 270

“If we dropped all the prurient proscriptions and predilections [about sex work], we could see it unmasked as what it really is: a shitty job just like any other.” The struggle for sex workers’ rights is relevant to anyone living under capitalism, argue Molly Smith and Juno Mac in their new book Revolting Prostitutes: The Fight for Sex Workers’ Rights. As Smith tells Vice:

“Sex workers, as precarious workers, have a lot to say to other workers. The rise of the gig economy means that work is increasingly precarious in lots of different ways. The paradigm of a job for life—leave school or college at 16 or 21, go to work somewhere with a good basic salary and benefits, stay there for 30 or 40 years—that trade union activism has been, and is in many ways still, based on no longer exists. Sex workers have always been precarious—and so they have a lot of knowledge to share with other workers about how this works, and how to organize against it.”


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Ryan Yates

Ryan Yates was the NSFW Editor (2013–2018) and Literary Editor for Autostraddle.com, with bylines in Nylon, Refinery29, The Toast, Bitch, The Daily Beast, Jezebel, and elsewhere. They live in Los Angeles and also on twitter and instagram.

Ryan has written 1142 articles for us.

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