15 Queer WNBA Players to Follow and Thirst After on Instagram This Season

The WNBA kicked off its season on Friday and it has been a week of buzzer-beating games, record-breaking moments, and all-around badassery. To celebrate, here’s a list of 15 openly queer WNBA players to follow/thirst after on Instagram this 25th anniversary season. (These are players who are active on Instagram! I have, in fact, heard of Diana Taurasi; I cannot, however, make her post photos to her social media!)

If I missed any of your faves, who do post to Insta regularly, hit me up in the comments. I’ll just be sitting here waiting for some of the players who aren’t in this post to casually come on out. 😇


Queer WNBA Players to Thirst After on Instagram This Season

Courtney Williams, Atlanta Dream

Layshia Clarendon, New York Liberty*

Sue Bird, Seattle Storm

DeWanna Bonner, Connecticut Sun

Alyssa Thomas, Connecticut Sun

Candice Dupree, Seattle Storm

Amanda Zahui B., Los Angeles Sparks

Brittney Griner, Phoenix Mercury

Chelsea Gray, Las Vegas Aces

Stefanie Dolson, Chicago Sky

Elena Delle Donne, Washington Mystics

Angel McCoughtry, Las Vegas Aces

Aerial Powers, Minnesota Lynx

Breanna Stewart, Seattle Storm

Natasha Cloud, Washington Mystics


* Layshia Clarendon was released by the Liberty today, but I’m leaving them on this list because I think they’ll get picked up by another team. They’re a natural leader and league veteran and they deserve a roster spot. 

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Heather Hogan is an Autostraddle senior writer who lives in New York City with her partner, Stacy, and their cackle of rescued pets. She's a member of the Television Critics Association, the Gay and Lesbian Entertainment Critics Association, and a Rotten Tomatoes Tomatometer critic. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Heather has written 1154 articles for us.

15 Comments

  1. Yes so happy to see queer W content! I would also add the Vanderquigs to this list. Their wedding pics made me cry. Dreaming for a DeWanna Bonner/AT wedding one day…

  2. Shekeena Stricklen, Natasha Howard, Riquina Williams, Natisha Hiedeman, Crystal Dangerfield, Courtney Vandersloot, Glory Johnson, Allie Quigley, Asia Durr, Kristi Toliver, Briann January, Tiffany Hayes….those are the ones I can think of that werent on this list.

  3. Does anyone else have feelings about the inclusion of Griner on these lists? After the 2015 domestic violence arrest, I had to get rid of my fan jersey. Even though I’m a lifelong WNBA fan, I realized how upsetting reading these lists have become because I’m just waiting for her to pop-up. Although Griner completed counseling and people do change (though there have been on-court fights since), it’s something I’ve been thinking a lot about in the last couple years. How much attention we pay to perpetrators of intimate partner violence and the collective amnesia that happens once it leaves the news, except for other survivors. And how much silence there is when the perpetrators and/or survivors are queer and trans.

    The WNBA has changed so much in the last few years alone and I was pleased to see how many people made this list (or listed in the comments) and are now out with active WNBA careers.

    • Perhaps there were other players they could have added other than BG, but her arrest was over 6 years ago, and she was 24, not the sole batterer, participated in court-ordered therapy,and hasn’t had a personal incident like it since. Anyways, she faces enough hate for nonsense like— not wearing a shirt on her own property, being gay, being a tall woman, being too masculine, and being a lesbian who was court-ordered to pay child support for non-biological children,— (taboo nonsense that many LGBT people are discriminated against for that also need to be discussed) and she doesn’t really need to be persecuted for a 6 y/o arrest on top of it all. She faces enough public scolding.

    • i feel like the issue of forgiveness and acceptance is one we have to start grappling with in so, so many ways. the tribute to Kobe Bryant last year was difficult – he admitted to assault and seemed to know it was wrong, but didn’t want consequences. i couldn’t really feel like supporting the wnba – though helpful in isolation – was really atonement for the past. but i also really trust the members of the wnba, and am unqualified to judge them.

      someone i don’t really want to signal boost once made the point that when a person changes and decides to do the right thing, the response shouldn’t be fuck you forever, but welcome to the right side of this issue.

      so, hopefully that’s where BG is.

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