100+ LGBTQ Black Women You Should Know: The Epic Black History Month Megapost

Eds Note: We’re in the process of updating this list for 2015 to include so many more women who’ve showed up on our radar since it was published. Those additions are below, but don’t worry — we’re not done!

Samira Wiley, Actress

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Samira Wiley, who plays our favorite character, Poussey, on Orange is the New Black, went public about her relationship with OITNB writer Lauren Morelli in 2014. Wiley later appeared in the OUT 100 as the “Ingenue of the Year,” with a photo shoot memorializing Josephine Baker‘s appearance in 1934’s “Zouzoou,” the first time a black woman starred in a major motion picture. “I grew up in the church,” she told OUT Magazine. “I have seen my parents inspire people and give them hope and faith most of my life. I feel like I’ve always wanted to have my work be some sort of ministry, because that’s what my parents do and that’s the only word I have for it.”

Wiley is a Julliard graduate who has also appeared in TV commercials, The Sitter, and Person of Interest.


Reverend Dr. Pamela R. Lightsey, Scholar, Speaker, Professor & Preacher

photo via BU Photojournalism. Photo by Dominique Riofrio.

photo via BU Photojournalism. Photo by Dominique Riofrio.

According to her biography at Boston University, where she serves as Associate Dean for Community Life and Lifelong Learning and Clinical Assistant Professor of Contextual Theology and Practice, “Pamela Lightsey is a scholar, social justice activist, and military veteran whose academic and research interests include: classical and contemporary just war theory, Womanist theology, Queer theory and theology, and African American religious history and theologies.” She currently co-chairs the American Academy of Religion’s Womanist Approaches to Religion and Society Group, serves on the Executive Committee for the Soul Repair Project and is a member of the Pan Methodist Commission. Follow her on twitter at @OneNabi.

You can also see Pamela, along with Alicia Garza and Ashley Yates, on Feb 10th, 2015, at 7pm at Boston University for a panel discussion with Rev. Osagyefo Sekou and Rev. Willis Johnson. As Associate Dean at the School of Theology, I will be moderating.

(h/t to MizJenkins at the salad bowl)


Djuan Keila Trent, Speaker & Writer

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Trent, who competed in the 2011 Miss America pageant, describes herself as “Georgia Peach by Birth. Unbridled Kentuckian by Choice. Modern Day Griot. Speaker. Writer. Lover. Enthusiast turned Activist. Miss Kentucky 2010,” and, on her blog this past March, as queer:

For months, I have been contemplating how I would write this post, how I would position it, when would be the right time to post it. Should I make it funny? Should I make it mysterious? Should I make it serious? Should I pick a special date to do it? Should I build some kind of anticipation around it? Hmmm…ain’t nobody got time for that. I have written and re-written and deleted and restarted this post more times than I care to share, and after all of that I have finally realized: “There ain’t nothin’ to it, but to do it.” So, here we go folks…

I am queer.

She’s been living out and proud ever since, writing on her own website and even on Autostraddle! She also appeared on the cover of STORY Magazine this summer.


Ashley C. Ford, Staff Writer at Buzzfeed LGBT

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Ashley C. Ford is best known for her writing on Buzzfeed, where she is on staff, and The Rumpus. After graduating from Ball State in 2011, Ford worked for Pivot Marketing in Indianapolis before moving to Brooklyn for her Buzzfeed gig. Follow her on twitter at @iSmashFizzle.


Glory Johnson, WNBA Player

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Glory Johnson is a forward for the Tulsa Shock, selected in the first round of the 2012 WNBA Draft. She’s also got a B.A. in Global Studies and a Master’s Degree in Communications from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, where she sometimes played against her now-fiancee, WNBA player Brittney Griner. She was selected for the Western Conference All-Star Squad in 2013 and 2014. Follow her on twitter at @MissVol25.


Patrisse Cullors, Activist

Patrisse Cullors, co-creator of #BlackLivesMatter, has been organizing since she was 16, growing up in LA, and was kicked out of her house when she came out as queer. Since then, she’s organized around police brutality, the school-to-prison pipeline, and environmental justice.


Opal Tometi, Activist

Opal Tometi co-created #BlackLivesMatter, and she is also the director of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI) in New York. Her work ties together immigrant and racial justice. “We are committed to fight for the rights and dignity of all Black communities – including Black immigrants,” she wrote on New American Media, “We’ll continue to be part of this global movement for Black lives until we are truly certain that all Black lives matter.”


Alexis Templeton, Activist

Alexis Templeton first made headlines for the protests coordinated out of Ferguson, MO by Millenial Activists United, which she co-founded with Brittany Ferrell and Ashley Yates while protesting the murder of Mike Brown. She’s still in the fight for black lives with MAU, and now she’s married to MAU co-founder Ferrell.


Eboné F. Bell, Entrepreneur & Editor

Bell is the founder and managing editor of Tagg magazine, “created by women, for lesbian, bisexual, and transgender community to provide the DC Metropolitan Area queer community with a central source for lesbian culture, news, and events.” Bell also launched the Capital Queer Prom in 2007, an annual event that both gives LGBTs “the prom they should have had years ago” and raises tons of money for local charities. In 2014, she was honored by Equality Virginia as an Outstanding Virginian.


Lydia Okello, Fashion Blogger & Autostraddle Fashion/Style Editor

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Born in Oslo and currently at home in Vancouver, Canada, Lydia has been blogging at her website StyleisStyle, which she describes as “primarily a personal style + outfit blog, combined with my inspirations and snapshots from my day to day life,” since 2008. She was named a Blogger of the Moment” by ModCloth in 2011, and has been featured in Glamour Magazine, BUST Magazine, Seventeen, Refinery 29, Buzzfeed, Rookie, gURL.com, MTV Style Blog, Fashionably Black and The Clothes Horse among many others. She’s currently the Fashion/Style Editor for this website right here, Autostraddle.com. You can also find her on her tumblr, pinteresttwitter, facebook, lookbook, and instagram.


L’lerrét Ailith, Writer & Activist

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Ailith was introduced to many in the public when she appeared in the MTV and Logo documentary Laverne Cox Presents: The T Word. There she talked about being a trans student in college and about her efforts to decriminalize the lives of trans youth of color in New Orleans, where she lives. Since then, she’s continued make her voice heard by blogging at her own site and writing essays for Autostraddle that focus on the violence and struggles trans women of color face. She’s also the co-founder of the New Orleans chapter of the Trans Women of Color Collective. Follow her on twitter.


Kimberly McLeod, Media Strategist

Kimberly McLeod is the founder & editor in chief of ELIXHER, a GLAAD-nominated website and print magazine for black LGBT women. A public speaker with a background in journalism and media activism, she’s worked with or written for publications including ESSENCE, TIME, Marie Claire, Clutch, theGrio, EBONY and People Stylewatch. Formerly, McLeod worked as Director of Communications for the National Black Justice Coalition, the nation’s leading Black LGBT civil rights organization, and managed the Communities of African Descent media program for GLAAD.


Alicia Garza, Activist

Alicia Garza created #BlackLivesMatter along with Patrisse Cullors and Opal Tometi, and with them has organized in the wake of the Zimmerman verdict in 2013. “It was a response to the anti-Black racism that permeates our society and also, unfortunately, our movements,” she wrote on Feminist Wire. Garza also organizes with the National Domestic Workers Alliance, and she has been central in organizing actions like the #BlackLivesMatter Freedom Ride to Ferguson, and also helped shut down BART on Black Friday.


CeCe McDonald, Activist

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CeCe McDonald has traveled the country as a vocal advocate for trans liberation and prison abolition since her release from prison last year. McDonald is one of many black trans women who have been incarcerated for defending themselves in the face of racist, transphobic violence. She studied fashion, and is the focus of Laverne Cox’s documentary FREE CeCe!


Brittany Ferrell, Activist

Brittany Ferrell left nursing school to be on the ground protesting in Ferguson. With Templeton and Yates, she started Millennial Activists United and continues to struggle for justice for black lives with Templeton, her wife.


Hannah Hodson, Actress & Autostraddle Contributing Editor

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Hannah Hodson, who was born in San Francisco and currently lives in New York, got her first big break with a Nike Air Jordan commercial directed by Spike Lee and went on to win a 2007 Young Artist’s Award for her appearance in the TNT film special The Ron Clark Story. She was featured in the 2009 TNT Drama Hawthorne as the daughter of Jada Pinket-Smith’s character, as well as on TV shows like Blue Bloods and The Following. Hannah has also been featured in Sesi Magazine and Sophisticated Black Hair and currently is a Contributing Editor for Autostraddle.com.


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Danielle & Aisha

You may recognize these two because they were the first lesbian wedding featured in Essence Magazine!

Danielle Moodie-Mills, Educator, Advocate & Writer

Danielle is an Advisor to the FIRE Initiative, the creator of Politini and the Editor-in-Chief of threeLOL. She’s worked as an education lobbyist for the National Wildlife Federation, an aide to Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Congresswoman Yvette Clark. She’s been recognized as one of the top 100 emerging African-Americans by The Root and one of the Forty-Under-40 national LGBT Leaders by The Advocate. You can also read her writing at The Atlantic, Essence, and The Huffington Post. Follow her on twitter.

Aisha Moodie-Mills, Policy Analyst & Politician

In addition to co-hosting Politini with Danielle, Aisha appears regularly on MSNBC, is a Senior fellow at the Center for American Progress (where she directs the FIRE Initiative) and serves on the board of Choice USA. She’s worked as a political advisor, private-sector liaison and fundraiser to over 40 Congress members including six from the Congressional Black Caucus. Like Danielle, she was also named a one of the top 100 emerging African-Americans by The Root and one of the Forty-Under-40 national LGBT Leaders by The Advocate. Follow her on twitter.


Reina Gossett, Activist, Writer & Artist

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Reina Gossett‘s work centers the lives and power of trans and gender non-conforming people. Gossett is currently the Activist-in-Residence at Barnard’s Center for Research on Women and is producing Happy Birthday Marsha, a film that tells the story of Marsha P. Johnson and Silvia Rivera, with Sasha Wortzel. She has worked with Queers for Economic Justice, Critical Resistance, and as the membership director of the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, where she helped orchestrate the success of the campaign for trans healthcare coverage by New York State Medicaid. Her writing around dismantling the prison system, trans and queer liberation, and trans and queer histories can be found online and in print.


Karen Williams, Comedian

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Karen has been called “… a laugh riot!” by Curve Magazine and is currently booking her HEALING WITH HUMOR – FREEDOM FROM FEAR National Comedy Tour, which seeks “victory over violence all across America.” She’s performed all over the world including many repeat engagements with Olivia Travel, was the former TV host for New York variety show “In The Life,” and has had her writing published in numerous anthologies.

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Riese is the 37-year-old CEO, CFO and Editor-in-Chief of Autostraddle.com as well as an award-winning writer, blogger, fictionist, copywriter, video-maker, low-key Jewish power lesbian and aspiring cyber-performance artist who grew up in Michigan, lost her mind in New York and then headed West. Her work has appeared in nine books including "The Bigger the Better The Tighter The Sweater: 21 Funny Women on Beauty, Body Image & Other Hazards Of Being Female," magazines including Marie Claire and Curve, and all over the web including Nylon, Queerty, Nerve, Bitch, Emily Books and Jezebel. She had a very popular personal blog once upon a time, and then she recapped The L Word, and then she had the idea to make this place, and now here we all are! In 2016, she was nominated for a GLAAD Award for Outstanding Digital Journalism. Follow her on twitter and instagram.

Riese has written 2676 articles for us.

106 Comments

  1. A terrific list but I did want to point out one glaring omission… Miss Major Griffin-Gracy. Stonewall veteran, longtime trans activist and a woman who’s been working hard for prisoners rights. I think if you were to ask any of the trans women on your list she’s one of the first people they’d put on their own lists.

  2. Yay! Go black queer women go black queer women GO!

    YAYYYYYYY!

    This needs to happen every single year. Such a beautifully historical post, too!
    I appreciate you Riese. Really. Thank you for this. It means a great deal to see that there are 100+ black queer women that the world (and readers of AS) got introduced to and re-introduced to. And I can’t wait to see this list grow…

    I can’t wait to see all of the other lists that’ll come from this.

    Riese, you bringing that fire grrrrrl.

  3. HOLY SHIT THIS IS AMAZING!!!

    I’m saving this for future reference and when I’m dealing with the “lonelies” of mostly finding myself in really white queer academic spaces.

    This was a pick me up!

  4. MOMS MABLEY.
    Love her so much. And Raven. And Edmonia Lewis. And Robin Roberts. And Ethel Waters. And Josephine Baker. And Staceyann Chin. And Angel Haze. And Wanda Sykes.
    Actually, weirdly, Robin Roberts’ coming out had a HUGE effect on me, maybe more so than any other celebrity coming out so far. I guess because I hadn’t expected it, she’s such a background presence in my life (I always have the news on), and she just seems so…normal? I get teary just thinking about it. She’s so great. Love her so much.

  5. holy crap moms mabley was queer? I’ve watched snippets of her in different documentaries when talking about women in media and comedic icons (one documentary done by pbs) and non of them mentioned that detail. this list is awesome, thank you for compiling it?

  6. Look at all these beautiful and amazing people!

    for the record, I wrote about Edmonia Lewis in a feminism class years ago and pretty much became obsessed with her so seeing her on this list made me SO HAPPY.

  7. I heard a (hopefully true) rumor that Angela Davis will be teaching an undergraduate course at UCSC spring 2015 for the history of consciousness department. It would be amazing to take a class taught by her.

    This list is amazing, so many books, stories and music I need to check out. Thank you!

  8. Josephine Baker in that tux… *drool*

    But in all seriousness, thank you for this. Loads of people I knew. But there were many I either hadn’t heard of or didn’t know they were queer identified. Lots of music to hear/reading to do/history to learn!

  9. This is fantastic! Thanks for introducing me to several amazing people I wasn’t aware of before.

    I also want to add that Tracy Chapman’s official website is super fun!

    And am I the only one who thinks that picture of Angelina Weld Grimké looks a lot like Marsha Thomason? She should totally play Angelina in a biopic!

  10. I LOVE THIS POST! I love it so much because after all these years of following Autostraddle, this is the first post to inspire me to make an account. I had to ! I needed to mention one of my personal faves, whom I think never gets recognized in a category like this is BIBI MCGILL. She’s infamous for being the lead musician in Beyonce’s all female touring band, as “the guitarist with the Afro “. She started doing solo shows when Pink hit her up to audition for her. After that everyone wanted a piece of that in their act.

    Here’s a quote from Bibi –
    “Being not only a woman but a Black woman has helped my career because it’s different. Not everybody is doing it. Guitar is an instrument that mostly Caucasian men play…and then here I come with the tattoos and the fro.”

  11. Oh but where’s Joan Armatrading? My mum let me have her vinyl collection when I was a kid and I would play love and affection over and over. What a voice! What lyrics. It was even on the L word.

    • Totally agree, Hat. Everyone always lists Tracy Chapman, but leaves out Joan Armatrading which is totally her original inspiration. Because Joan’s British? Because she struggled with the closet for decades? Whatever, I want to see her listed in everything too, because she was such an influence in the 70s and 80s..

  12. a queer musican and filmmaker: b.steady

    http://www.youtube.com/user/QueerBGirl
    http://bsteady.tumblr.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/bsteadwell

    from her facebook page:
    “queerpop songstress filmmaker from washington dc.
    Biografie:
    B.Steady explores the art of making fun pop music and films for queer people of color and other folks with silenced struggles. Located somewhere within the traditions of Sweet Honey in the Rock, julie dash, The Clovers, issa rae, Bobby McFerrin, audre lorde and BonIver.

    She released her first self-produced album on Itunes in January 2011, and posts an original live song weekly on her queerBgirl youtube video blog.

    Her music is simple yet infectious, and always sincere. In her own words, “Some days I want to write sappy love songs for my girlfriend. Some days I want to write about a season. Some days I want to write about racism. But mostly, I want to write fun music for people like me.”

    B is a singer/MC in the queer pop group The Lost Bois, and is currently attending Howard University in pursuit of her M.F.A. in film.”

  13. THIS x10000000!!!!!!

    Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love. Love.

  14. You forgot of María Cora who is a fascinating multi-faceted African American-Puerto Rican artist, comfortable as a writer, poet, filmmaker, performer, and musician. Her inspired lead vocals have added pizzazz to many groups since arriving in the San Francisco Bay Area in the 1980’s, including Orquesta Sabrosita, Los Pleneros de la 24, Azúcar y Crema, Babacool, Once, Canto de Corazón, Different Touch, and currently Azúcar Con Aché. Her versatile bilingual vocal talent shines in work as diverse as principal narrator for the documentary “Every Child is Born a Poet: The Life of Piri Thomas”, as writer/director and narrator for the short film “Negra Linda”, as vocalist on the Piri Thomas recording “’No Mo’ Barrio Blues”, and as writer/actress of the play “Verbo Corazón: Latina Heart Rhythm”. María has served as MC/Host for a multitude of events, including the Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival, the San Francisco World Drum Festival, the Redwood Music Festival, and the Encuentro del Canto Popular. She has also been honored with a La Estrella award, a Lesbian of Achievement and Vision (LAVA) award, a Prisma award for Achievement in Performing Arts, and a WAMMIE Alternative Music award for Best Latin Band (with Azúcar y Crema). She holds a BA from Harvard University/Radcliffe College and an MA in Ethnic Studies from San Francisco State University. María Cora has lived in the Bay Area for the past 32 years and now is the Associate Director of LHRC (Lesbian Health Research Center) at UCSF!

    • It probably depends on how broadly you define queer, certainly having read her work, most of her main characters were not straight, even when they were mostly heterosexual they often had polyamourous and pansexual relationships.

  15. this list is incredible! I’m not sure if I missed it though, is Lena Waithe on here? I’m still reeling from her Twenties previews, and I know Dear White People will be incredible. Thank you for all of the hard work, Riese!

  16. There are some more glaring omissions to this list including and I really don’t understand how she was missed, Nikki Giovanni. But I still appreciate the wonderful celebration. For me as an artist it gives me something to strive for, definitely want to make this list.

    • aachhhh nikki givoanni is right here in my notebook on the original brainstorming list i made a while ago when i started planning out this list, i have no idea what happened w/r/t her never making it to this computer screen, you’re so right! anyhow, i’m glad you liked the list just the same!!

    • Janelle Monae has never said anything very specific about her sexuality (aside from telling Pitchfork that she had recently broken up with a boyfriend), so I would refrain from making assumptions. Believe me, I’d love for her to be queer, but it’s not fair to ascribe a sexuality to someone without their input.

  17. I was discussing this with the President recently, and we were both like, Anita Dolce Vita, Managing Editor of dapperQ, should be on this list! I mean, pffft, what is happening here? http://giphy.com/gifs/ebArIR9bXq4b6 A beautiful, successful African-American woman that is doing so much on many fronts. A public servant like me! I luv her and you should too in 2015!

    Gotta go now, my new book comes out on June 10th: http://giphy.com/gifs/UbzJl5FZDsQqQ

  18. Really? We’re really citing “Lesbian Lists” as a true source???

    No offense, I applaud the idea of promoting people we think are queer, but it’s nice to get sources that are a little more airtight than a book that contains a bunch of un-cited, arbitrary lists.

  19. I really like the pictures, but at the end of the day anyone’s sexual preference is as irrelevant as their skin color. I will never understand why anybody feels the need to announce their sexual preference it’s your business and the world doesn’t need to know, I respect you no more or less regardless of your partner preferences – my sexual preference = my business.
    I think life and humanity should be celebrated, not individual groups…black, white, gay, straight doesn’t matter…

    • I’m confused as to why you would be reading a lesbian site, then…? And I consider my partner preference to be part of my humanity that I want to celebrate.

    • It most definitely matters… Every piece and part of us matter. As a hetero black woman, it is more than important to find places where we can be acknowledged, validated, advised and validated. There is NO WAY in this world you have never consulted, joined, read or sought out a website, magazine, group, book, club, etc. that is not either gender specific, hobby/interest specific, disability/illness specific – I could go on and on. We all seek information that applies to “us” whatever that wonderfully, different, unique and completely valid “us” is. You wouldn’t be on this website if you hadn’t. Why am I here? Because even as a Multi-Ethnic, mostly Black woman, I know that I have Sisters in this world that I owe a deep debt to for their struggle, bravery and complete gifts to the world as a result of their authenticity and just being fuckin’ bad ass! If you don’t believe your sexuality matters, think again, because your employer does, the government does, the church does, your stupid fuckin’ nosy neighbors do, and if you don’t have the gift of a loving, open family, they care. In fact that list can go on and on, too, depending on your life situation. In fact, I’m convinced you’re still in the closet. In fact, I’d be willing to say you’re a closeted White lesbian because you definitely live a life of White privilege (read Peggy Macintosh’s Unpacking the Invisible Backpack). Does that matter? No, not to me but you come on a totally lesbian site and say the most homophobic bullshit like “black, white, gay, straight – doesn’t matter” It ALL matters, it’s all relative, Baby. You can’t be poor, “unattractive” by society’s standards, a person of color, an out-of-fashion dresser, a cashier at McDonalds, a meat-eater, a non-meat-eater – anything that mainstream society sees as “out of the norm” without being judged. So, trust and believe your color/ethnicity, religion, political views, and YES your sexual orientation definitely matters.

  20. I wish Toshi Reagon was on this list!

    Also: Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Chirlane McCray, June Jordan. Everyone from Combahee River Collective.

    Anyway, love the list! Especially the historical figures.

  21. Im blown away. Did not know that over half these women were/are lesbians. At the age of 65 im still learning new things. thank you for making so many of us aware of this tidbit. I thank you.

  22. Just wanted to add one very important person not on the list…Gail Ann Dorsey. David Bowie’s Bass Player for the the last 20 years, Independent artist/performer, and session bassist extraordinaire. She is the shizzle. Bass players always get forgotten, but without us the funking soul in the groove lacks the punch of love!

  23. All those women are not Lesbian, the name of the article is very misleading. I love the article that says, ” Bentley was an out lesbian from the get-go and once, dressed in “men’s clothing,” tried to marry a woman in Atlantic City. But during the McCarthy era Bentley took a turn — she married a man and wrote an article for Ebony magazine entitled “I am woman again,” about how she was “cured” of homosexuality by religion and female hormones.”

    Seem today, people are trying to become men, in stead of taking hormones to help them feel more like the woman they are, they are taking hormones to try to become the man they can never been. You cannot change your genetics. So, at least one got it right.

  24. I had no idea Ms. Vance was dead. I didn’t follow her career fully. I just know her from being a lifelong SNL junkie. She was one of the only bright spots in a particularly shitty cast year.

  25. im going to be very brief.I was appalled by the statement that was legated on Mrs.Carmen Mctae,who is my very missed mother.Being a entertainer myself I’m aware that people ,men’s or lady gravat,like flies…So what I’m tring to say my morher id not a lesbian…

  26. Bishop Yvette Flunder has been a for runner in the Human Rights and Social Justis Movement. she is presently the presiding Bishop of The Fellowship of Affirming Ministries Inc. She’s is on the Demcratic Ministers Axillary for Northern California President Ellect Oboma campaign. She is The Voice that won’t be silent anymore speaking against homophobia and Transphobia, Bigotry and inter-relations of abuse. She is the Pastor of the City of Refuge United Church of Christ in Oakland Ca.

  27. This was a wonderful read!!! Two people to add Bishop Yvette Flunder out of Oakland California, and Pastor Vanessa Brown of Rivers of Living Water Churches in New York and New Jersey!! FACINATING LGBT women making huge waves!

  28. I know I’m late to the party, but Angel Haze isn’t a woman… they’ve repeatedly stated that they prefer neutral pronouns and feel closer to a masculine identity than a feminine one, if anything.

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  30. I know I’m late to the party, but Angel Haze isn’t a woman… they’ve repeatedly stated that they prefer neutral pronouns and feel closer to a masculine identity than a feminine one, if anything.

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