Pop Culture Fix: Carol Aird Performs “You Don’t Own Me” at the Stonewall Inn

Flung Out of Space

Carol Aird, most recently seen getting robbed of an Oscar a little over a year ago, recently turned up in the West Village at Stonewall Inn to perform a stunning rendition of “You Don’t Own Me” for a charity event benefiting the Newton Action Alliance.  The people who don’t own her include but are not limited to: Donald Trump and Fucking Harge. She followed up “You Don’t Own Me” by lending her voice to backup vocals for Adele’s “Hello” and lending her head to a pussy hat like what ladies wore at the Women’s March on Washington D.C. during presidential inauguration weekend.

I actually thought this was just a really good drag performance until I logged onto Slack this morning and saw a message from Stef saying SOMEONE WAKE UP HEATHER.


Teevee

+ I don’t know if I have the stomach to watch this season of Veep after the way last season ended and also the way our IRL presidential race ended, but here’s the first trailer for season six.

+ Please enjoy these familiar faces in the new trailer for the queer web series Different Girls.


Movies

+ I do not believe we have yet talked about this new Kristen Stewart movie, the follow up to 2017’s Cannes Film Festival darling, Totino.

+ Excuse me. Julie Andrews almost DIED filming Mary Poppins?!


Queer Humans, Out and About

+ You’ve seen it by now, but just a reminder:

+ Brandi Carlile asked some big time stars to cover her “The Story” album for the War Child UK charity. ONE OF THEM WAS DOLLY PARTON. And also The Indigo Girls!

“This is a David and Goliath story,” Carlile said in a statement. “Since becoming a mother, the reality of a child’s beautiful life being torn apart by war felt like too big of a problem for me. So I asked my heroes and friends to help me launch a rock at the giant that is our refugee crisis and help in the only way we know how: through the power of music.”

+ Being out looks good on Sara Ramirez.

+ Roxane Gay is not here for Simon & Schuster’s equivocating about Milo.

+ Queer WNBA players are allies are not happy with former WNBA star Candice Wiggins’ recent claim that she felt discriminated against in the league because everyone else was gay and that  “you have to look like a man, play like a man to get respect.” Mechelle Voepel, the gold standard of sports reporting in women’s basketball, interviewed loads of past and present players about Wiggins’ remarks over at ESPN.


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Heather Hogan is an Autostraddle senior editor who lives in New York City with her partner, Stacy, and their cackle of rescued pets. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr.

Heather has written 586 articles for us.

23 Comments

  1. I appreciate that the WNBA players, both past and present, are walking a fine line–on the one hand, they don’t want to dismiss bullying outright because it is a real issue for so many, but on the other, they want to defend a league that’s being unfairly maligned–but it’s frustrating not to see Wiggins called out for what she’s actually doing.

    Candice Wiggins is lying.

    Candice Wiggins is exploiting a league that allowed her to play in front of her friends and family in order to get a book deal.

    Candice Wiggins is feeding into worst preconceived narratives about the league to boost her own celebrity.

    She is a liar and I wish more people were in a prominent position to call her out for lying.

    • I appreciate the way the players have responded. Not only because it doesn’t discount the possibility that bullying could have taken place and should be taken seriously, but also because they have to do such a delicate dance here. If the players were bolder in their comments and called her a liar, it would be construed as evidence of the bullying and jealousy Wiggins said she suffered from.

      They are between a rock and a hard place and have to manage to defend themselves while keeping it positive. Which *still* won’t stop some haters from jumping on the story, but has kept things from spiraling.

      I also appreciate that the players have focused on the fact that their sexuality and personal lives and femininity should not be subjects of public scrutiny without (as far as I have seen) feeling like they have to rush to assert their sexual orientation. They’ve pointed out the absurdity of the statistic without making it seem like being gay itself is a problem.

      What is completely absurd here is that the league itself has given no response and left it to the players to defend the WNBA themselves. The league is damn lucky that they have such intelligent, thoughtful women playing for them.

      And of course the mainstream media are happy to take a poorly written flame article and run with it without doing any research of their own or ever covering the league if there isn’t a scandal to flout. It’s THEIR job to call out lies, not repeat them. And yet, here we are.

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