NSFW Lesbosexy Sunday Is Dancing Naked

Welcome to NSFW Sunday!

+ At Nerve, Kate Hakala interviewed burlesque dancer Michelle L’amour on being naked, being on stage, bitch face and more:

“What was your first thought walking on stage during that first burlesque show?

I was just terrified. At my first solo performance, I didn’t even do a striptease. I just did this slightly acrobatic, erotic dance in front of the band. I was just mainly freaking out because it was the first time I was wearing a thong in front of people. I was fully covered. I had a pair of tights on, and a pair of fishnets. I wasn’t really hanging out there. After that, I just got excited about it. The thongs disappeared until they were non-existent. Now, I am the most naked woman in the world.”

+ At the Rumpus, Antonia Crane interviewed erotic writer Lady Cheeky on her sexual disorder, tweet sex and more:

“Your body has nothing to do with how sexy you feel. In the trope of curvy women, I still get hurt and it’s hard. The feeling I have of being a sexual person is inherent. For better or for worse, no one can take that away from us. How we feel about our physical selves is linked to what society and advertising tells us is normal or acceptable, but it’s ultimately our responsibility to take our self-image back and reclaim it, as it were. I could be working on my self-image, still be self-conscious, still not want my lover to touch my stomach, and still tap into my inherent sexiness, because, as I said before, sexy is who we are. I had this realization when I felt bad about myself and looked in the mirror recently. I said to myself, “This is how I came out today. I’m cooked.” Then I click into my sexuality and I feel good. At some point you’ve got to give it up: This shirt is going to hike up my hips. Done. Let it. I’m going out.

+ At the Millions, Julia Fierro writes about writing about sex in literature:

“In writing my first novel, Cutting Teeth, when I got to the first scene that demanded dramatized sex — action, sound, smell, taste, the works — I paused. The word that made me lift my fingers from the keyboard was “clitoris.” Was it okay to use this word? What would my fellow literary writers, my former teachers and classmates at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop think of me? I laughed at my insecurity, although part of me loathed my hesitation. Of course it was okay. It’s just a body part, I told myself. I had the same reaction in the other sex scenes I wrote — most involved a man and a woman, one two women. Nipples. Cock. Dick. Balls. Even typing these words now gives me a shiver of fear, as if the literary gods will strike me dead, or brandish me with a scarlet S for writing not only bad sex, but any sex at all.”

via Juan Stevens photography

via Juan Stevens photography

+ Actress Claudia Black discusses her lesbian sex scenes in Strange Frame:

+Vaginas: they are awesome:

“Vaginas and vulvas are so diverse as to defy quantification. Normal doesn’t exist. Porn promotes images of women whose genitals look like pre-pubescent girls. These images have sadly been internalized by members of both sexes, but we no longer have to look to porn to find images of genitalia other than our own. So ladies, stand up and be proud: most likely your lady parts are both normal and extraordinary. Vaginas (and vulvas too!) are wacky, wonderful and in no way average.”

switch the boi wonder via gray37

switch the boi wonder via gray37

+ Breasts! They are neat.

+ Young adults are having a totally unscandalous amount of sex. Tell the media.

+ A conservative group has named Barnes & Noble one of its “ top 12 facilitators of porn.

+ At the Hairpin, Lucy and Kaelyn discuss what it’s like when your long-distance relationship is all over the Internet (and adorable).

+ The Feminist Porn Awards happened! No official releases yet, but follow events at #FPA2013.


 

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Carolyn Yates was the NSFW Editor (2013–2018) and Literary Editor for Autostraddle.com, with bylines in Nylon, Refinery29, The Toast, Bitch, Xtra!, Jezebel, and elsewhere. They live in Los Angeles and also on twitter and instagram.

Carolyn has written 1119 articles for us.

19 Comments

  1. That Julia Fierro article at the Millions is great not just for its commentary on sex in literature, but also for its analysis of being a woman in the literary scene. It’s a pretty great read.

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