Real Talk: On Not Wearing Bras (Yes, It’s Okay to Go Braless)

Bra Week_Rory Midhani_640

WELCOME TO BRA WEEK! This week and next, the Autostraddle writers and some special guests will be giving you the scoop on over-the-shoulder-boulder-holders and otherwise-inclined chest-covering situations — fashion, history, feelings and so much more.


Here’s a random fact: Did you know there is actually no common medical reason to wear a bra?

That’s right. None. Contrary to popular belief, bras don’t improve breast health, prevent breast sagging, or anything else. Quite simply, there is no agreed upon health benefit to wearing bras that applies to every single woman.

I know it probably seems a bit strange for me to be saying this. After all, I am a lingerie blogger so I should be Team Bra 24/7, right? But I’ve been thinking about the whole bra/no-bra thing for awhile, and some of the language we have around bras (and the women who don’t wear bras) really bothers me.

As much as I love bras (and, as you’ve probably guessed, I really love them), even I don’t wear one everyday. I wore a bra more often when my nipples were pierced, but since I’ve taken the piercings out, I’ve gone back to wearing a bra — a lot of (but not all of) the time. Which is fine because no one should feel obligated to wear a bra, in the same way no one should feel obligated to wear a corset or obligated wear a girdle or obligated to wear any underwear at all for that matter.

While I understand that some people may prefer their breast shape with a bra or are more comfortable wearing a bra (for a variety of reasons — heavy breasts, nipple sensitivity, back pain, etc.), that’s a completely different thing from the notion of compulsory bra wearing — saying every woman has to or should wear a bra. Unfortunately, that latter sentiment (you must wear a bra at all times!) is the general consensus from the society at large, including many facets of the lingerie community. And this article focuses on that social conversation regarding bra wearing.

What’s most interesting to me in about this whole bra/braless conversation is the ideas other people have why a woman might choose to go braless. Bralessness still has a ton of social stigma attached to it. People rarely attribute bralessness to comfort or personal preference; instead, it’s seen as a plea for sexual attention, a political statement, or even a lack of self-care. Why can’t bralessness ever just be an innocent, innocuous choice? Why are women made to feel that they always have to wear a bra (and, if we’re in the United Staes, a molded bra which hides your nipples)? It’s a thought-provoking question, and, as some of the illustrations hint at below, the idea that women’s bodies just aren’t good enough on their own is really old-fashioned.

The S-Bend 'Gibson Girl' Corset via Wikipedia

The S-Bend ‘Gibson Girl’ Corset
Via Wikipedia

What do I mean? Well, we already know that for several centuries, women wore stays or corsets almost everyday. A woman’s underpinnings were seen as connected to and a reflection of a her morality. I’ve often wondered if the phrase “loose woman” (as in, an “unchaste” or “immoral” woman) has its etymology in corset wearing. After all, the term has been around since the 15th century. Wealthy women could afford the greater restriction of mobility that came with more tightly bound stays. That contrasts to lower class and less affluent women who needed their stays looser to perform hard physical labor.

Not surprisingly, upper class women were also seen as “more” moral and worthy of protection than their poorer counterparts. For centuries, only a woman’s most intimate acquaintances ever saw her without her corset. If one went without a corset (or if the corset was visible), this was a sign of “ill-breeding,” and that woman might be assumed to be an actress, prostitute, or some other lady of ill-repute. In that way, wearing a corset, albeit within the strict rules of society, became a way to advertise that you were a morally upstanding female member of the community and so eligible for the privileges thereof, including admission to “good” society, a beneficial marriage, and the relative perks of politeness, etiquette, and being “treated like a lady.”

Now let’s fast forward 50 years or so later. By now the bra has been invented (in 1890, 1910, or the 16th century depending on who you read) and so has the girdle. Originally seen as a more comfortable and flexible substitute for the corset, the girdle also replaced the corset’s function as a moral boundary as well. Despite the comparative freedom a girdle offered, a “proper” woman still didn’t let her flesh jiggle or shake unencumbered. Everything had to be tightly restrained within the elastic, mesh, and straps of a foundation garment. Women who “broke the rules” were subject to unsympathetic criticism about both the shape of their bodies and the looseness of their morals. Sounds familiar.

So how is all that relevant today?

Well, despite our current beauty ideal for a soft, rounded, featureless cup shape (hello there, molded t-shirt bras), it’s important to remember that it’s just today’s beauty ideal. There’s no health study and certainly no moral judgment that should give it added weight. If you don’t care for that particular look or you don’t just flat out don’t like bras, that’s fine. It shouldn’t be a character judgment and it’s certainly not a “bad” reflection on who you are. It’s just a personal preference. In the same vein, for every woman, wearing a bra is a personal choice. It is her own decision for her own reasons, and no one else should get to judge.

Often, when I write articles like this, people just read the title and just right ahead to the assumption that I hate bras. But I don’t. However, it’s worth mentioning one more time — if you like wearing a bra, that’s cool. And if you don’t like wearing a bra, that’s still cool. Neither option is any more offensive or troublesome or immoral than wearing or not wearing a sweater.

Spanx on Rachel Ray. Yes. we’re still doing the before/after shot.

Spanx on Rachel Ray. Yes. we’re still doing the before/after shot.

I starting thinking about this today because I realized a lot of the conversations I hear about bras are less about how they make the wearer feel and more about how they make the wearer look, particularly to others. Words like, “flattering,” “correct,” and “proper,” are often thrown around without any consideration or commentary on the implied meaning behind those words. And let’s be clear, whether you’re wearing a bra for fashion or for support, if it helps you feel like the most comfortable, confident, and courageous women you can be, that’s a great thing. Keep on wearing your bras. But the point is, personal preferences matter.

One should never insist that bras are a requirement for every woman. Even if a woman is fuller-busted or happens to share your bra size, that doesn’t mean bras are a necessity for her. And, of course, it’s always a problem when the conversation on bras and bra wearing turns into thinly-disguised body snark. All bodies are fine, regardless of if those bodies wear bras and conform to our notions of beauty or not. The culture of picking apart and shaming women for not wearing a bra needs to stop.

I’m also really not okay with framing bras as the cure for sagging breasts (breasts sag eventually; it’s what they do), as a form of instant liposuction (“You’ll look like you’ve lost 10 pounds!”; why should looking thinner be every woman’s goal?), as a way of putting down non-Western women and non-Western beauty standards (everyone who has ever used an old issue of National Geographic to make a point about bras), or as a way of deciding who “deserves” public abuse and humiliation (posting photos of women for the sole purpose of trash-talking them, something I’ve seen even in so-called woman-friendly or body positive communities).

Honestly, it’s all part of the same silly ball of wax women have been dealing with for hundreds of years, “Good women do this. Bad women do that — and the bad women deserve to be punished.”

No doubt, some of you reading this may be thinking, “Well that’s easy for you to say, you’re small-chested! None of this applies to women with larger breasts.” But that misses the point.

One, there are fuller-busted women who prefer going braless. They’re just not as visible or as vocal because we live in a very bra-centric culture and because bralessness has an attached social stigma. Two, the rules for bra-wearing apply to all women with breasts, regardless of which end of the size spectrum they fall on. Even if a smaller-busted woman doesn’t “need” a bra for comfort’s sake or what have you, she’s often encouraged to wear one anyway (often a push-up bra) because her breasts are still seen as inferior and sub-standard. The fact that women with larger busts deal with a different kind of social stigma as a result of going braless is very relevant to this conversation, but the topic applies to all women with breasts, including those who are shamed for having large nipples, assymetric breasts, or ptotic (sagging) breasts. The point is, no matter what kind of breasts you have, it’s always an issue to go without a bra.

However, just to emphasize, if you prefer wearing a bra, for whatever reason, that’s great.

My New Lingerie a.k.a. the Made by Niki 'Feel"

My New Lingerie a.k.a. the Made by Niki ‘Feel’

As you’ve probably noticed, this article isn’t about vilifying bras or starting a no-bra revolution (if it were, I wouldn’t bought that fab Made By Niki pictured above). I still love bras, and I still want to talk about bras. And while the nerd in me is very curious about the flammability of bras, it should be obvious this article isn’t about “bra-burning” either. Instead, I want to emphasize that going without a bra is not the end of the world and it’s nice to be reminded of that.

The reasons we wear bras are just as much tied to cultural factors as they are to physical ones. It’s just that people often find a conversation on the social issues behind why we do what we do a lot harder than giving a flat medical reason for why we do what we do. Furthermore, this is just a friendly reminder that if you see someone going braless and don’t care for it? Well, is ignoring it really so hard to do? Their breasts literally have nothing to do with you.

One of the other reasons I wanted to have this wear a bra/go braless conversation is because we don’t see very many “normal” breasts anymore. And by normal, I mean how breasts look without a bra. I get emails from readers all the time who think their breasts are the wrong shape or the wrong size or the wrong symmetry when their bosom is really, truly, perfectly average. The only problem here is that we’ve gotten so used to seeing women in bras all the time, that many of us have lost touch of what breasts look like without underwires and contour cups and support slings and all that good stuff.

Victoria's Secret, fantasy boobs in more ways than one.

Victoria’s Secret, fantasy boobs in more ways than one.

To sum it all up, our particular notion of what a woman’s bust should look like is just that — our particular notion. In the 1910s it was one way, in the 1920s another, and the in 1950s still another. Our idea of what a woman’s breasts should look like is not a static, unchanging, “objective” thing. And the fact that “bra fit” is often mentioned in the same sentence with “health” or “medicine” doesn’t mean bras are beyond any sort of question or commentary. Centuries ago, people spoke about the health benefits of corsets, yet women have somehow managed to do fine without them. Lingerie, like all elements of women’s dress, is tied to fashion, and fashion — both its looks and trends – changes over time and in response to social norms of beauty.

Every woman’s breasts are different, even if they don’t fit the mold(ed cup). If you’re a woman who prefers to wear a bra, that’s awesome. And if you’re a woman who prefers to go braless (whether all the time or occasionally), that’s also awesome. Regardless, unlike what the ads of yesteryear or even today would have you believe, you don’t have a “figure problem.” You’ve just got breasts, and they’re fine as is.


Originally published on thelingerieaddict.com. Republished WITH PERMISSION MOTHERF*CKERS.

Header by Rory Midhani


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42 Comments

  1. 0

    Well…. I go bra-less sometimes. Often it gets a little uncomfy after a while. BUT last friday I got a new tattoo 🙂 On both shoulders, so I cannot wear a bra, or anything with straps for that matter. So I’ve been bra-less for several days and will be for another week-ish. It has been interesting ! Many moons have passed since I went more than a day with out the boulder holders LOL ! I agree with the article, you should choose what you want ’bout bras and not worry what society is thinking.

  2. 0

    “People rarely attribute bralessness to comfort or personal preference; instead, it’s seen as a plea for sexual attention, a political statement, or even a lack of self-care.”

    oh god, yes.

    I can’t stand it when otherwise fairly progressive thinkers think it’s okay to make a wisecrack about bralessness because society finds our nipples and our breasts so offensive that they must be hidden at all times. The truth is, I don’t wear bras for my comfort – I wear them for YOUR comfort. If I didn’t feel pressured by society to cover up and buckle down, I would never wear a bra except for rigorous exercise. But I don’t feel like I have that choice.

    It makes me upset that this isn’t a more mainstream feminist issue.

  3. 0

    Big breasts, I find it very comfy to go braless a lot of the time. My comfort in bras has increased since getting some that are sized properly, but I’ll wear one maybe half the time, including work. Tank tops/camis under stuff are wonderful.

  4. 0

    real talk: I took off my bra the minute I saw this headline. There’s some evidence that it’s in fact better to not wear a bra. My F-cups are certainly happy when I don’t, even just for a while.

    Most days, however, I do feel compelled to wear a bra, because I feel somewhat naked without one and because I’m still learning to like the way my boobs look sans-support.

  5. 0

    I’m a 34D and I wear a bra about as often as I don’t these days. When I was younger, I was under the impression that the soreness felt after a day of going bra-less was the weight of the breast tissue being pulled by gravity. Pretty much all of my bigger-chested high school friends were under this impression. (We also thought wearing bras at night would deter growth, so some of us only ever took them off to shower.) I was doing some random 3am googling in college when I learned that, actually, the soreness stems from the muscles behind the breasts, the pectorals. Those muscles are coddled by bras and therefore kept from developing. So building your pectorals has the potential to give breasts a perkier (I kinda hate that word) form. I still don’t really know about it. There’s conflicting science on it, probably because no one has found a way to spin it as something profitable. All I do know is that after getting past the soreness (which took about a month for me; and that’s still wearing a bra half the time), I’ve come to love going bra-less to feel less constricted, to explore different silhouettes, to experience my own body in new ways, to piss off misogynists, etc.

    Also, this article was rad because it basically said “You do you, and don’t let cultural language surrounding this topic stop you!” 😀

  6. 0

    Small boobs and I pretty much never where a bra these days. Of course, I happen to live in a community where people can pretty much where whatever they want without judgement, and I essentially work at home, so I don’t need to worry about looking “professional.”
    I’ll occasionally where a bra if I’m out selling something and wearing a thinner shirt, but I feel more and more comfortable going braless.
    I’ll also wear sports bras without a shirt when I’m working outside in the summer but that doesn’t really count…

  7. 0

    I love being braless, however, I almost always wear a bra in public. I’d rather not wear one, but I feel when I do go braless in public that I’m constantly being stared at. I almost feel a bit like I’m braking the law! However, there is times that I feel like wearing a bra makes my outfit look better, and you’re right it is a personal choice and no one should feel like they should or shouldn’t wear a bra. Choice and agency are our friends here. There is not policy we must obey here except a socially constructed one, and anything that is socially constructed is in general, oppressive, derogatory and false.

  8. 0

    *disclaimer: if braless works for you, you crack on!*

    I’m a 32HH. My boobs flap around and slap my skin and THUD down really hard if so much as walk upstairs at a reasonable pace, and I get the dreaded underboob sweat as well as a terrifically unpleasant feeling of them flying around all over the place.

    In short, it’s horrible.

    I cannot go without a bra if I’m doing more than ambling slowly around my flat (which I do pretty often, to be fair…)so irrespective of whether it is better for boobs to be ‘free’ or not, I’m going to continue wearing a bra. Going without makes a pretty damn negative impact on my life! Add to that the fact that suddenly both me and everybody around me is suddenly far more aware than usual of them, and I think I’ll stick with convention.

    /coolstorybro

    • 0

      Yeeeah, I’m in the same boat. There’s basically no chance of me going braless in public. At home, I take it off as soon as I don’t have to be around other people, but I can’t imagine not wearing one out and about. Mine are too large, move around too much, and hang a bit lower than I would like for them to be braless. Plus, wearing the right bra makes me feel awesome because I end up carrying myself better and like the way I look in my clothes better.
      So as much as they’re a pain because of price and because of the lack of proper sizes available in my area, I’m still going to wear one. Yay for those that can go without, though.

  9. 0

    When I was little (like 10) and my older sister (by a year) started wearing bras I was SO jealous and made my mom go out and get me those stupid training bra things, although I could’ve continued to go braless (well, maybe if I made use of the whole bandaids-over-the-nips thing) until I was thirteen or fourteen.
    Now I’m like a solid 36DD or something like that (I really should get fitted again) and I wish I didn’t have to strap into a bra every day. But it’s just so sweaty/uncomfortable/weird not to that I don’t think I could ever go braless for even a day unless I was just being a bum at my house. My person basically has no boobs and owns more bras (sports bras) than I do and I just DO NOT UNDERSTAND. Dude, if you’ve got itty bitty boobs, rock those bandaids. Do it for the rest of us poor boobful people.
    I work at a super gay/feminist hippy pizza joint and for a hot minute a lot of the girls I work with were going braless to make a point. I kind of found it weird, but also I admired their courage/guts.

  10. 0

    My boobs are somewhat large, very saggy, and i’m fat (which already makes me default to looking sloppy, according to society bullshit). I mean, i’m expected to vaccuum seal my whole body before going in public. I try to never wear a bra unless i’m wearing something so structured that my braless breasts would pull down the fabric and be uncomfortable. The underboob sweat is kind of a bummer, but otherwise i love not wearing a bra because i know i shouldnt be ashamed of the natural shape of my breasts, but some days i still feel like i look bad without one but i try to recognize that as a social construction. And i dont really care if people think my saggy boobs are gross. People think my whole body is gross anyway so fuck ’em.

  11. 0

    Yes to this!

    I’m braless 90% of my life… unless I’m wearing a push-up that makes my cleavage so ridiculous that I can snuggle my chin in them for a nap. I always hear talk about sagging, but like… Boobs are sacks of fat. What else would they do? #SaggSquad

  12. 0

    I was gifted with generous boobs (around a 32-34 E sometimes F to be exact) and I’m a size 10 with a relatively small waist. Ordinarily people would assume that means I need a bra. But I very VERY rarely wear one. I find bras, particularly under-wired ones, uncomfortable and they dig in in the wrong place. I get annoyed when I’m told that I should be measured to find my perfect fitting bra because I’ve been measured near enough everywhere and the sizes they told me ranged from 28FF to 34D, and everything in between. Finding a bra that fits and is comfy is a nightmare for me. So eventually I gave up and I basically just wear a crop top in place of a bra.
    Also, not wearing a bra does not equal sagging, I may just be lucky but despite my plentiful fun bags my friends are always amazed that I’m braless and boys have accused me of having a boob job because saggy they are not!
    At the end of the day, boobs are BOOBS and all lovely every one of them!
    I also LOVE bras and spend a fair bit of money on pretty lingerie, but it tends to only come out on special occasions! Happy days!

  13. 0

    “Two, the rules for bra-wearing apply to all women with breasts, regardless of which end of the size spectrum they fall on. Even if a smaller-busted woman doesn’t “need” a bra for comfort’s sake or what have you, she’s often encouraged to wear one anyway”

    yep, i got that talk from my mum recently. i’m a 38A (UK, whatever that is in other sizes), so there isn’t that much boob there, but apparently i still need to wear a bra.
    the really annoying thing is before HRT i used to wander around shirtless all the time, so they have already seen my nipples/chest.

  14. 0

    There’s a really old saying: “She’s a neat shape in stays but a slattern in jumps.” Jumps were a looser alternative to stays in the 16-1700s, and ‘slattern’ at the time meant ‘slobby.’ It’s come to mean ‘slutty.’ So yeah, there totally is and has been a society-wide assumption that unstructured clothing (or nowadays, visible body fat) is a sign of “loose” morals.

    That’s a contradiction I find fascinating– that body rolls are considered obscenely sexual in our culture (example: the Illinois middle school that banned leggings for female students of a certain size because they were too “suggestive”) while fat bodies are in the same breath desexualized or even more often described as sexually repulsive (example: “Fat people shouldn’t wear _______. No one wants to see that.”)

    Does it really all come down to the patriarchy trying to control women by controlling their bodies? And if so… what makes fat so dangerous?

  15. 0

    I definitely go braless a large percentage of the time, and whenever possible, I also go shirtless! I am a GORGEOUS fat trans dyke, I love flaunting my body and telling society to go fuck itself!

    I will wear a bra if I’m out on a date, or going dancing, at a formal event,…etc, but aside from that, my 44Bs are free and happy!

    Plus, I love weirding my mom out with my nipple piercings!!! 😛

  16. 0

    Good article- I almost never wear a bra but I’m beginning to more often these days because I have really sticky out nipples and I’m always getting the message that its inappropriate to have them visible. I wish they weren’t sexualized. I already have chronic pain and I think it’s exacerbated by wearing a bra.

  17. 0

    34D/DD (depending on the time of the month) and constantly in a bra, except sometimes at home… Then I spent a week in the Amazon jungle, and stopped giving a crap. Went a few days without one and really enjoyed it. Also: crazy humid jungle boob sweat made me do it. Now, I’m back in the city (still in Peru) and I just spent the day going bra-less. It might be a habit I cultivate back home because it actually feels really awesome.

  18. 0

    I’m an 8D (US size 30D) and I was a 10H (US size 32H) before getting a breast reduction due to suffering back/neck/shoulder pain and having trouble fitting into my clothes. Even at my old breast size, I headed out braless a couple of times (and usually regretted it, because they swung around uncomfortably whenever I walked fast) and did not draw any odd looks. Now, at my smaller size, I occasionally go braless in public if it helps my clothing fit better/I don’t want visible bra straps and don’t want to wear a strapless. Nobody seems to notice/care.

    I’m not sure if this convention is as strictly adhered to where I live (Australia) or in other comparatively ‘Western’ countries such as Sweden and The Netherlands as it is in America. In my country in particular, I’ve seen quite a few people going braless in public (and not just small-chested people): nobody seems to stare/comment/frown disapprovingly at them (although I guess the fact that I even noticed just goes to show it’s far from being the norm). Still, given that we are the land of sunbaking and swimming, I think Aussies have a relatively healthy attitude towards boobs. We even have a few very popular topless beaches and topless baths, and it is not uncommon to see people with boobs subaking topless on ‘regular’ beaches, nor to see topless promo people wearing nothing but bodypaint.

    Pretty grateful for this. However, I don’t make a habit of going braless ALL the time because 1. exercising without a bra makes my boobs hurt, 2. it’s annoying when they swing around and the fabric of my clothes brushes my nipples and 3. I think structured tops/dresses look better on me when I wear a bra.

  19. 0

    I registered just to post this comment. This article made me cry. I’m 5’1″, 200 pounds, with “saggy” 36G breasts. I do not own any bras because I literally (<–yes that is the correct word) cannot breathe in them. Sometimes I wear tighter undershirts (like to my job in accounting at a major corporation), but I prefer to wear no undergarments at all. I often have panic attacks when I'm out and end up having to go home, because I'm afraid I'll be arrested and have to register as a sex offender or something. People come up to me in public and say horrible things all the time. In San Francisco. IN SAN FRANCISCO!

    I feel like I don't exist in the "boob" narrative – either I just haven't been "properly fitted" yet (oh believe me I have, at several places), or I should be wearing a binder. Yes, this gets even more complicated because I'm genderqueer, short-haired, wear men's clothes and shoes, etc. But I don't want top surgery. I don't want to wear a binder (I tried – again with the "can't breathe" thing). I don't want to lose weight. I don't even feel like my unbound chest is incompatible with my gender identity. I just want my breasts to stop being such a goddamned big deal.
    It's so icky and creepy that people I don't know (and even ones I do know), workplaces, and public space all feel like they have some kind of ownership or rights over my body.

  20. 0

    THANK YOU! I haven’t worn a bra in years and I LOVE it! And I don’t really care if you can see anything through my shirts. I’m still clothed! But the feeling of being “free” is wonderful! Thank you for this article!

  21. 0

    I’m 14 and a 32C so whenever I have gym class at school I strip out of my bra in the locker room and run around in the field braless. Thank god it’s an all girl gym class!

  22. 0

    expensive—undergarments. According to Business Week, the women’s intimates’ industry generates over $11 billion a year in revenues. You can go braless all the time the results of the study may be intriguing, but it’s doubtful that droves of American women are going to ditch their bras anytime soon. For one thing, a study by the Center for Talent Innovation found that politically correct but also fashionable to go braless in the United States. Since then, women men who jiggle around the work place are deemed executives all type of bras give women heart attacks cancer back pain from wearing all the time you did wear bras an when without yes risk did wear bras health to go without bras all the time.?
    On health they were at risk from wearing bras? Focused on women ages 18 to 35. Furthermore, the study from bras wearing give women risk wearing bras all type of bras According to France’s English-language news site The Local, one 28-year-old participant reported multiple benefits: “I breathe more easily, I carry myself better, and I having yes back pain.” We’ll see what she says at age 50. Benefit it’s to go braless all the time without bras. Also on Shine: Is Victoria’s Secret Marketing to Teens with their Bright Young Things Line? Did tell in ones about their bras reported all were at risk from wearing there bras

    • 0

      expensive—undergarments. According to Business Week, the women’s intimates’ industry generates over $11 billion a year in revenues. You can go braless all the time the results of the study may be intriguing, but it’s doubtful that droves of American women are going to ditch their bras anytime soon. For one thing, a study by the Center for Talent Innovation found that politically correct but also fashionable to go braless in the United States. Since then, women men who jiggle around the work place are deemed executives all type of bras give women heart attacks cancer back pain from wearing all the time you did wear bras an when without yes risk did wear bras health to go without bras all the time.?
      On health they were at risk from wearing bras? Focused on women ages 18 to 35. Furthermore, the study from bras wearing give women risk wearing bras all type of bras According to France’s English-language news site The Local, one 28-year-old participant reported multiple benefits: “I breathe more easily, I carry myself better, and I having yes back pain.” We’ll see what she says at age 50. Benefit it’s to go braless all the time without bras. Also on Shine: Is Victoria’s Secret Marketing to Teens with their Bright Young Things Line? Did tell in ones about their bras reported all were at risk from wearing there bras

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