Texas, Mississippi National Guard Won’t Process Benefits For Same-Sex Couples Despite Pentagon Orders

Feature Image via Politico

Last week, the Associated Press reported that neither the Texas nor the Mississippi National Guard would be following the Pentagon directive to honor legal marriages between same-sex couples for several important benefits purposes, including medical care, housing, and family separation allowances. Couples were turned away from installations in Texas beginning Sept. 3, when the policy went into effect.

Both states have attributed the moves to their bans on same-sex marriage, and federal installations in each state will be required to process the applications per federal policy. But the number of facilities operating under state versus federal policy varies by state, and some service members have already complained about being referred to federal installations hours away from their homes.

The memorandum from Texas Military Forces Major General John F. Nichols announcing the decision not to process same-sex benefits at state facilities. (via: The Blaze)

The memorandum from Texas Military Forces Major General John F. Nichols announcing the decision not to process same-sex benefits at state facilities (via The Blaze)

National Guard soldiers fall in one of two categories: Title 32, which encompasses state level jobs, and Title 10, which designates federal positions. Title 32 soldiers operate under their state’s governor, while Title 10 soldiers are subject to federal policy set by President Obama as Commander-in-Chief. State forces, then, follow policy set by the governor even when it conflicts with federal rules. That makes policies like the ones in Texas and Mississippi both legal and out of federal control.

A Mississippi National Guard spokesman declined to comment to Autostraddle Tuesday morning, stating the situation had not changed since it was reported last week. The National Guard issued a statement recognizing the situation and affirming that all federal installations will process benefits enrollment.

“We are aware that some states have determined that their military departments would not be in compliance with state law if they were to use their state funded personnel and facilities in enrolling same-sex spouses of National Guard Members in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System (DEERS),” the statement from spokesman Major Jon Craig reads.

(via Politico)

(via Politico)

So far, officials in the 13 other states banning gay marriage have indicated they will follow federal law, the AP reported. However, the split nature of National Guard forces means other states could technically follow in Texas and Mississippi’s footsteps if their governors decide to stand by state law.

The situation is a good reminder that the Defense of Marriage Act dust has not settled. As LGBT service members apply for benefits and protections for their same-sex partners and families, states must continue to evaluate their positions and determine when a state law that conflicts with federal law is worth defending.

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Kaitlyn is a recent college grad, nanny and journalist living in New York — although, truth be told, she spends most of her time on Tumblr. Talk to her about intersectionality, Battlestar Galactica, and bacon if you want to be best friends.

Kaitlyn has written 49 articles for us.

3 Comments

  1. Thumb up 5

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    Fuckin hell. Just when I fall back in love with my backwards ass state something like this gets released and I begin to question it all again!
    WHY, TEXAS?! WHY? Get your shit together…and I mean if nothing else can we at least stop voting for Rick Perry?!

    It’s like that backstreet boys song “You’re tearing up my heart when I’m with you, but when we are apart I’m feeling it to.”

  2. Thumb up 7

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    “As LGBT service members apply for benefits and protections for their same-sex partners and families, states must continue to evaluate their positions and determine when a state law that conflicts with federal law is worth defending.”

    Maybe you mean cis-LGB? Just a reminder, there are no openly trans service members. Trans people may still not openly serve in the US military.

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      Good point! That complicates things even further for trans* service members — they may not be in same-sex couples, but if their partner is the same gender as the one the military has in its records for them, they won’t be able to get these benefits, either. The misgendering of trans* soldiers is even more evidence that this policy is unfair and discriminatory. Just because trans* people can’t be out in the military doesn’t mean they aren’t a part of it, though! And these states’ actions can definitely affect them.

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