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Quiz: Which Queer Short Story Collection Should You Read?

Need some bite-sized pieces of queer fiction? Try a short story collection! Take this quiz and it will match you with a book of short stories: an anthology featuring various contributors or a single author collection! Whether your interests are queer horror, Indigenous futurism, or realist stories about queer Black church ladies, there’s a book here you will love!


What are you growing in your ideal garden/backyard?(Required)
Which genre are you in the mood for?(Required)
Which gemstone/crystal speaks to you?(Required)
Choose a recent queer TV show:(Required)
Pick a musician/band:(Required)
What's your favorite holiday/notable day of the year?(Required)
What looks good for breakfast?(Required)
What's your favorite flavor of chips?(Required)
Pick a famous queer person:(Required)
Pick a couch to read your book on:(Required)
What kind of queer representation would you like in your short stories?(Required)
Which Autostraddle column is/was a must-read for you?(Required)
Which cold beverage are you drinking while reading?(Required)
Which three word description appeals?(Required)
If you could be a wild animal, which would you pick?(Required)


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Casey

Known in some internet circles as Casey the Canadian Lesbrarian, Casey Stepaniuk is a writer, librarian, and new parent. She writes for Book Riot and Autostraddle about queer and/or bookish stuff. Ask her about cats, bisexuality, libraries, queer books, drinking tea, and her baby. Her website is Casey the Canadian Lesbrarian. Find her on Twitter, Litsy, Storygraph Goodreads and Instagram.

Casey has written 120 articles for us.

22 Comments

  1. I got: Buffalo is the New Buffalo Chelsea Vowel

    Chelsea Vowel — who also writes as âpihtawikosisân — published this collection of Métis futurism to acclaim in 2022. The science fiction stories here tackle themes of ancestral traditions, colonization and its impacts on Indigenous peoples, Indigenous resistance, and more. Looking back in order to imagine a future, the work references a common contemporary saying among Indigenous people: “education is the new buffalo.” In other words, education is the backbone of survival as buffalo historically was for Plains nations. But what, Vowel asks, if Indigenous people ensured that ancestral ways — like dependance on the buffalo — continue into the future instead of relegating them to the past? Vowel investigates this question in the book’s eight stories. In one, a Two-Spirit rougarou shapeshifts in the 19th century and becomes involved in an organization that successfully changes the future and stops Canadian colonial expansion. In others, foxes transform into humans and entangle themselves in human romance and a Métis man is gored by a radioactive bison and gains superpowers.

    • Perfect, thank you! ♡
      “Xenocultivars: Stories of Queer Growth edited by Isabela Oliveira and Jed Seb
      This Lambda Award nominated anthology of speculative short fiction focuses on the theme of growth: “emerging and developing to flourishing and cultivating.” If you’re looking for an intense dose of queer joy, Xenocultivars is just the thing. Highlights include “Folded Into Tendril and Leaf” by Bogi Takács, an own voices story which features an intersex protagonist in love and also investigates themes of language, body types, and immigration. “How to Make a Spell Jar” by EA Crawley is a witchy fantasy story about a “useful, sugary, and slightly dangerous” brew prepared just for a special someone. Another story, “The Mandrake Loves the Olive” by Sonia Suleman, is inspired by Palestinian folklore. In Julian Stuart’s “The Aloe’s Bargain,” a trans girl can talk to her aloe plant, from whom she learns unconditional love. The book includes an admirable mix of author identities and styles, as well as diverse genres and subgenres.”

  2. Secret Lives of Church Ladies here! This looks lovely, thank you.

    Any chance we could get a full list of the books? (Or a full list of the pretty rocks in the third question?)

    • The full list is:
      Slug and Other Stories by Megan Milks
      Fruiting Bodies by Kathryn Harlan
      Gods of Want by K-Ming Chang
      Xenocultivars: Stories of Queer Growth edited by Isabela Oliveira and Jed Seb
      Buffalo Is The New Buffalo by Chelsea Vowel
      A Safe Girl to Love by Casey Plett
      Queer Little Nightmares by edited by David Ly and Daniel Zomparelli
      The Secret Lives of Church Ladies by Deesha Philyaw

      Enjoy!!

  3. I got A Safe Girl to Love, which is probably my favorite Casey Plett writing ever!

    I also didn’t know The Secret Lives of Church Ladies was queer? It’s been in TBR pile for years, but now it’s definitely moving up the pile!

    • well i caved and picked what i would START my all day breakfast with and got secret lives of church ladies. but i am just gonna try all of story collections except fruiting bodies which i dont * cough* have the stomach for. oooh maybe i will match the (other) books w the bfasts and eat a bfast with each book! yes yes i love this plan. thank you casey you are a genius librarian.

  4. I love these quizzes but it would be great if the last page listed all the possible books, not just the one that gets picked!

    I got:

    Xenocultivars: Stories of Queer Growth, edited by Isabela Oliveira and Jed Seb

    This Lambda Award nominated anthology of speculative short fiction focuses on the theme of growth: “emerging and developing to flourishing and cultivating.” If you’re looking for an intense dose of queer joy, Xenocultivars is just the thing. Highlights include “Folded Into Tendril and Leaf” by Bogi Takács, an own voices story which features an intersex protagonist in love and also investigates themes of language, body types, and immigration. “How to Make a Spell Jar” by EA Crawley is a witchy fantasy story about a “useful, sugary, and slightly dangerous” brew prepared just for a special someone. Another story, “The Mandrake Loves the Olive” by Sonia Suleman, is inspired by Palestinian folklore. In Julian Stuart’s “The Aloe’s Bargain,” a trans girl can talk to her aloe plant, from whom she learns unconditional love. The book includes an admirable mix of author identities and styles, as well as diverse genres and subgenres.

  5. Coming back to report that I’m reading Xenocultivars: Stories of Queer Growth, edited by Isabela Oliveira and Jed Seb and it. Is. So. Good!!

    I requested it from my library based solely on this line from the blurb: “a trans girl can talk to her aloe plant, from whom she learns unconditional love.” and I am happy to report that I loved that story and I’m loving all of the stories so far.

  6. Coming back to report that I’m finally reading the book the quiz recommended for me – Buffalo is the New Buffalo. I requested that my library buy it and 3+ months later, I’m reading it. Yay libraries.

    I’m halfway through and I’m so glad I’m reading it, even though it’s challenging on multiple levels.

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