NSFW Lesbosexy Sunday Is Talking Politics And Pleasure

Feature image of @thebigbeautiful via rodeoh.

All of the photographs on NSFW Sundays are taken from various tumblrs and do not belong to us. All are linked and credited to the best of our abilities in hopes of attracting more traffic to the tumblrs and photographers who have blessed us with this imagery. The inclusion of a photograph here should not be interpreted as an assertion of the model’s gender identity or sexual orientation. If there is a photo included here that belongs to you and you want it removed, please email bren [at] autostraddle dot com and it will be removed promptly, no questions asked.


Welcome to NSFW Sunday! It’s the last weekend of August, make it a good one.

+ Queer porn creator Courtney Trouble discussed their work, politics, pleasure, fisting, TroubleFilms and more:

“”When I started this in 2002, I was rebelling against homophobia,” Trouble said. “There’s always been a political need for access to queer porn because of the cultural impact that goes beyond the entertainment factor.”

Not all of the films are shot through a political lens — Trouble thinks that people with non-conforming gender identities deserve the luxury of watching porn without being barraged with identity politics. Trouble said that the genesis of their queer porn philosophy — borne from the intersection of local punk culture, BDSM and leather communities, and East Bay political factions — was to normalize how nonconforming people have sex.”

malloryyrae via rodeoh

malloryyrae via rodeoh

+ Math is a print (!) feminist porn magazine that looks like a medical textbook that creator MacKenzie Peck says “is to turn people on using words and images rarely seen but often sought.” At the Huffington Post, Peck discusses why she created Math and shares a peek inside:

“[S]he embarked on a mission to provide her peers with the salacious material they could feel comfortable perusing, knowing that it was created safely, consensually and fairly. ‘Readers can still have the discovery, the surprise, even that sense of taboo,’ Peck said. ‘But with the knowledge that everything was produced in collaboration with models and using the most ethical practices.’

She set out to create, in other words, a ‘safe version of the sexy internet.’

Peck’s other main goal was to increase the kinds of bodies and relationships represented on the page, while still keeping her magazine nasty. ‘I often find in mainstream pornography, there is this inverse relationship between explicitness and quality,’ she expressed. ‘One of my main focuses is maintaining a high level of quality while continuing to push boundaries in terms of kink and sexuality and unrepresented groups.’”

Lizzie Gunst and Miki Hamano by Hana Haley for alexandranissa

Lizzie Gunst and Miki Hamano by Hana Haley for alexandranissa

+ You don’t have to be a good submissive.

+ Sex gets safer when sexual education discusses gender inequality.

+ Kissing isn’t always romantic.

via afeto

via afeto

+ Good Vibrations founder Joani Blank died earlier this month. In a profile at Bitch, Lynn Comella writes:

“Blank helped give form to what would eventually become known as ‘sex-positive feminism.’ She blended the educationally oriented and quasi-therapeutic approach to talking about sex that she had refined as a sex therapist with aspects of 1970s feminist consciousness-raising and humanistic sexology, turning her small vibrator shop into a sexual resource center for anyone who might wander in. She felt that talking about sex should be as casual as talking about the weather; she also believed that sexual information was a birthright and that no one should be made to feel ashamed or embarrassed for wanting more pleasure in their life.”

Karolina Laskowska collection with model Ceci Zhang, photographer J. Tuliniemi, MUA Anitka Kwiat. Via the lingerie addict.

Karolina Laskowska collection with model Ceci Zhang, photographer J. Tuliniemi, MUA Anitka Kwiat. Via the lingerie addict.

+ Are you queer and poly? A new Autostraddle series will explore how queer polyamory functions, how it feels, what it looks like and more. Tell me about your life and you might be featured!


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Ryan Yates

Ryan Yates was the NSFW Editor (2013–2018) and Literary Editor for Autostraddle.com, with bylines in Nylon, Refinery29, The Toast, Bitch, The Daily Beast, Jezebel, and elsewhere. They live in Los Angeles and also on twitter and instagram.

Ryan has written 1137 articles for us.

10 Comments

  1. Courtney Trouble and her TroubleFilms are very important to me. Her films are so inclusive of gender identities and sexual orientation and bodies. All of us need a space where differences of body and gender and emotion are celebrated sexually without predjudice.

  2. Okay, I know this is slightly off topic, but I just want to confirm something: is Autostraddle a better representative of the queer women’s community as a whole? This community just seems so amazing, but there are some posts I’ve come across on websites such as Facebook and Tumblr that are so damn triggering that they’ve left me feeling sick to my stomach and crying, and for some reason I feel like seeking solace on this sight. And the comments I’ve come across on those other websites are made primarily by the butch lesbian and the trans community, typically directed at each other. Ironically these are the two communities I feel most connected to, but the threats I’ve seen coming from both sides are scaring a newly out queer such as myself to the point where I’m actually scared of my own community. and I already feel incredibly lonely as it is.

    I am literally crying right now and I just want to believe that a majority of queer and trans women are as kind as they are on this website. I really hate coming off as this pathetic, but can someone please confirm this? I don’t even know why I feel the need to ask this….

    • Yes, absolutely the majority of us are kind, inclusive, regular people who just want to live our lives and be loved. :)

      Are their bigots in the LGBT community? Absolutely. There are people who are racist, transphobic, biphobic, misogynist, etc… Now if you want to question if that’s a majority, well, that’s where it gets to be a grey area. Racism, for example, is a systemic problem perpetuated by a white majority and that includes white LGBT folks who just refuse to “get it”. Plenty of cis people still harbor transphobic thoughts or positions. Biphobia can be rampant among gay men and lesbians. Gay men are totally capable of sexism and sexual harassment because they think they’re “allowed” to treat women like shit. And let’s not forget ableism!

      There’s no reason to assume someone is a good person just because they’ve got one or more letters in LGBT+. However, it’s our culture, our people, and our community and you’re more likely to be safer and connected to others. Just be discerning with where you go, who you spend your time with, etc. Don’t leave yourself wide open for the bigots and hurtful people in the LGBT community to lash out at you.

      You’ve always got AS and we’re here for ya. :)

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