Also.Also.Also: Planned Parenthood, Darkwing Duck, and Other Stories for Your Week

A brand new week of stuff and things! I’m trying out that no-knead Dutch oven bread on Wednesday and I’m honestly more excited than a person should probably be re: new bread. I hope the thing you’re most looking forward to this week goes off without a hitch!


Queer as in F*ck You

+ Transgender Activist and Actress Alexis Arquette Dies at 47.

+ Being LGBT in Arkansas Catholic Schools is Now Punishable by Expulsion.

+ The Queer Poor Aesthetic.

+ TransGriot Blogger Monica Roberts Honored By GLAAD For A Decade Of Excellence.


Doll Parts

+ Power Pose: Talking With Fat-Positive Yoga Activist Jessamyn Stanley.

+ Obama Moves to Protect Planned Parenthood Funding, Permanently.

+ In the Bonobo World, Female Camaraderie Prevails.


Saw This, Thought of You

+ Darkwing Duck and Ducktales are in Separate Universes and This is Not OK. I agree.


And Finally

This 60-foot tall inflatable moon debuted in Seoul.

moon-byeong-ho-kim

Laneia is the Executive Editor and founding member of Autostraddle, and you're the reason she's here.

Laneia has written 913 articles for us.

17 Comments

    • I agree with the dead-naming, but based on one of the articles I read yesterday Alexis’s brother David said Alexis, in the last few years was using both he and she pronouns as fit. First thing that came to mind was Alexis could be bi-gender and/or genderfluid? Cause when Alexis came out in the 90s bigender and genderfluid really weren’t in our vocabularies.

    • That statement from one brother, Richmond Arquette, was deleted. The official statement from all the siblings is now this one:

      “Our sister, Alexis Arquette, passed away this morning, September 11th, 2016.

      Alexis was a brilliant artist and painter, a singer, an entertainer and an actor. She starred in movies like Last Exit to Brooklyn, Jumpin’ at the Boneyard, Of Mice and Men, The Wedding Singer, and The Bride of Chucky. Her career was cut short, not by her passing, but by her decision to live her truth and her life as a transgender woman. Despite the fact that there are few parts for trans actors, she refused to play roles that were demeaning or stereotypical. She was a vanguard in the fight for understanding and acceptance for all trans people.

      She fiercely lived her reality in a world where it is dangerous to be a trans person—a world largely unready to accept differences among human beings, and where there is still the ugliness of violence and hostility towards people that we may not understand.

      Alexis was born as Robert, our brother. We loved him the moment he arrived. But he came in as more than a sibling—he came as our great teacher. As Alexis transitioned into being a woman, she taught us tolerance and acceptance. As she moved through her process, she became our sister, teaching us what real love is.

      We learned what real bravery is through watching her journey of living as a trans woman. We came to discover the one truth—that love is everything.

      In the days leading to her death, she told us she was already visiting the other side, and that where she was going, there was only one gender. That on the other side, we are free from all of the things that separate us in this life, and that we are all one.

      She passed away surrounded by love. We held her and sang her David Bowie’s “Starman” as she punched through the veil to the other side. We washed her body in rose petals and surrounded her with flowers.

      Alexis always had to do everything first. She left before we were ready to let her go. We are all heartbroken that she is no longer with us, but we are grateful for the grace and kindness we were all shown during this difficult time. We are comforted by the fact that Alexis came into our family and was our brother and then our sister, and that she gave us so much love. We will love you always, Alexis. We know we were the lucky ones.

      The family asks that in lieu of flowers or gifts, donations please be sent to organizations that support the LGBTQ community in honor of Alexis Arquette.

      Please respect our privacy during this time of grieving.”

      http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2016/09/11/actress_and_trans_activist_alexis_arquette_dies_at_47.html

      See also this story: http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/arquette-sibling-died-age-47/story?id=42015773

      “The passing of Arquette was announced on Facebook by her brother, Richmond.

      Richmond first posted a statement using a masculine pronoun to describe his sister, who was born Robert Arquette, but later deleted it, and replaced it with a statement from Patricia Arquette on behalf of his family, using the feminine pronoun.

      “Alexis was born as Robert, our brother. We loved him the moment he arrived. But he came in as more than a sibling — he came as our great teacher. As Alexis transitioned into being a woman, she taught us tolerance and acceptance. As she moved through her process, she became our sister, teaching us what real love is,” she wrote. “We learned what real bravery is through watching her journey of living as a trans woman. We came to discover the one truth -— that love is everything.

      “She passed away surrounded by love. We held her and sang her David Bowie’s ‘Starman’ as she punched through the veil to the other side,” the statement continued. “We washed her body in rose petals and surrounded her with flowers.”

      Arquette began her acting career at the age of 12. She starred in a number of films, including “Of Mice and Men,” “Bride of Chucky” and “The Wedding Singer,” before documenting her gender transition in the 2007 film, “Alexis Arquette: She’s My Brother.”

      ABC News first used male pronouns to identify Alexis Arquette in deference to how her brother identified her in his Facebook post, and later updated this story in accordance with the Arquette family’s newer statement.”

      • It greatly bothered me how many commenters on various articles were so incredibly eager (1) to accept Richmond Arquette’s implication that Alexis had detransitioned and used male pronouns at the time of her death, and (2) to lambaste those who criticized the misgendering as being clueless SJWs, etc.

  1. I saw the news about Alexis Arquette from the Xena fandom. I hadn’t realized this, but she played the mad emperor Caligula in the episode The God You Know. Very sad.

    I loved Darkwing Duck as a kid and even had the action figures. I think they’re in a box somewhere around here. There was Darkwing, of course, and Launchpad, and Gosalyn, and Megavolt. Megavolt was cool because you could light him up by flicking a flint inside him. Never cared for Ducktales as much. It couldn’t compare to Chip N Dale, in my opinion. Anyone else here old enough to have watched the old Disney Afternoon?

    I got a chuckle out of the bonobo article – I saw it on Twitter from another primatologist before I saw it here, so I’ve already read it. Key finding, in my opinion: the innovation in bonobo females is cross-generational alliances, and that’s unusual. In most primate species (really, mammal species) where the males stay put and the females transfer between groups (meaning the females will be unrelated), the older females are crap to the younger females. Take gorillas, for instance…poor things. It’s like Mean Girls except with apes. Yet bonobos break the pattern. Really important species for any research aiming to find models of female bonding that don’t rely on kin-selection.

  2. I love Obama. Really, four MORE years? Please? Anyone? I’m really up for amending term limits.

    Also, Darkwing Duck as an alternate universe? No. No. No. No. No. Nope. No. Nooooo. This is not happening. I reject that reality and substitute it with the one we all know is true. We all know St. Canard and Duckberg are on the East Coast and Cape Suzette is on the West Coast. This is canon and I’ll not accept otherwise.

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